How many hurdles do hearing-impaired children have to pass from hearing sounds to reacting?

  • Date:
  • Views:437
  • Source:Tiny Hearing Aids
For people with normal hearing, "chirp" is the chirping of birds, "whistle" is water flow, the sound of clapping hands, the sound of laughter, the deep voice of father, and the gentle voice of mother. . . Understanding these sounds is a matter of course.



But for children born with hearing loss, listening also requires learning. From hearing a sound to reacting, it takes a lot of hard practice and accumulation.


Human beings have a process of understanding the sounds of nature from low to high, from simple to complex. Along with this understanding process, people's auditory development has gradually become more and more perfect. , this process is customarily divided into four stages: auditory perception, auditory discrimination, auditory recognition, and auditory understanding. Some literature also divides it into auditory perception, auditory attention, perceived orientation, auditory identification, auditory memory, and auditory selection. , auditory feedback and auditory concepts and other eight levels.
These stages can exist and develop independently, or they can interact and be completed together.
Among them, auditory perception is the first stage of auditory development.

Auditory perception
Auditory perception is a physiological response of the human ear to sound, that is, the presence or absence of sound is judged through the auditory organ. This process lasts only a short time, but it is an important foundation for auditory development.
1. This process of hearing children is completed subconsciously. The auditory reflex shown by stimulating newborns with sounds of 60dB (SPL) in a quiet environment and 90dB (SPL) in a noisy environment is the earliest auditory perception phenomenon.
Auditory perception is a physiological response of the human ear to sound, which is to judge the presence or absence of sound through the auditory organ. This process lasts only a short time, but it is an important foundation for auditory development.
2. For postlingually deafened children and deaf adults, the process of auditory awareness is relatively easy to achieve. Because they have some hearing experience, they can easily associate the sounds transmitted through hearing aids or cochlear implants with the sounds they heard before they were deaf.
But for prelingually deaf and hearing-impaired children who have no hearing experience, the simple process of responding to sounds requires hard training to achieve.
When starting auditory perception training, they can use the help of vision to allow them to see the actions that cause sounds and the instruments that make sounds, as well as hear the sounds that represent a certain meaning, and then use body movements to express them. The awareness of sound gradually transitions to the organic connection between hearing and movement without visual aid.

This is why it is most common in hearing and speech rehabilitation institutions to use acoustic instruments such as drums, gongs, and cymbals for auditory training.


Contributed by: Ostar Peng Huihuan